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Public International Law Textbooks: From 2012 Onwards

Submitted by on 31/05/2017 – 11:37 amNo Comment

* Prepared by Henriette (Jet) Jakobien Liesker, Research Assistant, Norwegian Centre for Human Rights, University of Oslo.

2012

Gideon Boas, Public International Law: Contemporary Principles and Perspectives, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2012.

Public International Law offers a comprehensive understanding of international law as well as a fresh and highly accessible approach. While explaining the theory and development of international law, this work also examines how it functions in practice. Case studies and recent examples are infused in the discussion on each topic, and critical perspectives on the principles are given prominence, building an understanding of how and why the international legal system operates in the way it does and where it is heading.

James Crawford and Martti Koskenniemi (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to International Law, Cambridge University Press, 2012.

This intellectually rigorous introduction to international law encourages readers to engage with multiple aspects of the topic: as ‘law’ directing and shaping its subjects; as a technique for governing the world of states and beyond statehood; and as a framework within which several critical and constructivist projects are articulated. The articles situate international law in its historical and ideological context and examine core concepts such as sovereignty, jurisdiction and the state. Attention is also given to its operation within international institutions and in dispute settlement, and a separate section is devoted to international law’s ‘projects’: protecting human rights, eradicating poverty, the conservation of resources, the regulation of international trade and investment and the establishment of international order. The diverse group of contributors draws from disciplinary orientations ranging from positivism to postmodernism to ensure that this book is informed theoretically and politically, as well as grounded in practice.

 2013

Martin Dixon, Textbook on International Law, 7th edition, Oxford University Press, 2013.

The seventh edition of Textbook on International Law offers students a concise and focused introduction to international law, from the nature and sources of international law to the use of force and human rights. Dixon guides students through the legal principles and areas of controversy, bringing the subject to life with the use of topical examples to illustrate key concepts. The book incorporates helpful features including a glossary, chapter summaries and further reading.

Wade Mansell and Karen Openshaw, International Law: A Critical Introduction, Hart Publishing, 2013.

This book provides a critical introduction to the concepts, principles and rules of international law through a consideration of contemporary international events. It provides ways of considering the relevance of international law to particular disputes and also an appreciation of both the possibilities and limitations of legal method in international disputes. This in turn necessitates an examination of the relationship between international law and power. Thus rather than studying international law as a system of rules that purports to govern, or at least constrain, the international community, this book considers the actual effects of international law upon international disagreements. Underlying the book is the assertion that international law is political in content (in the sense of being concerned with the exercise of power) but that it draws much of its effectiveness from its self-portrayal as being apolitical, or at least politically neutral.

Christina Verones and Sebastien Rosselet, The Public International Law Study Guide for Students: Exercises and Answers, Hart Publishing, 2013.

A sound understanding of public international law is indispensable for any lawyer, whether working in an international or domestic context. It is therefore important that students have a thorough theoretical understanding of international law issues, and are able to apply the relevant international legal rules to a given set of facts, so as to arrive at a legally coherent conclusion. This practical aspect of learning international law is often neglected in favour of more theoretical aspects – which is where this book comes in. The book offers a series of hypothetical practical cases in public international law, including some of its specialised branches, such as international human rights law and international criminal law. It challenges students to practise and familiarise themselves with the methodology and to write solutions to practical international legal questions. The book is in two parts: part one contains practical (exam-like) questions, while part two contains the solutions. The practical questions in part one are organised by subject, such as treaty law or state responsibility. One chapter is dedicated to more complex ‘interconnected’ cases, where students are asked to tackle problems which span multiple potential cases and topics.

2014

Ademola Abass, Complete International Law: Text, Cases, and Materials, 2nd edition, Oxford University Press, 2014.

Complete International Law combines a wide range of case extracts with incisive author commentary to clearly demonstrate legal principles and the significance of case law. This innovative text encourages an active approach to learning with key point summaries, thinking points and self-test questions throughout; which aim to stimulate reflection about the importance of international law in today’s world.

Malcolm Evans (ed.), International Law, 4th edition, Oxford University Press, 2014.

Evans’ International Law provides wide-ranging analysis of all the key issues and themes in public international law and brings together an outstanding collection of interesting and diverse writings from the leading scholars in the field. The fourth edition succeeds both in explaining the principles of international law and exposing the debates and challenges that underlie it. Now fully revised and updated, it continues to provide an authoritative and stimulating overview of this increasingly important subject; revealing international law in its full diversity.

 Malcolm N. Shaw, International Law, 7th edition, Cambridge University Press, 2014.

This new edition of International Law confirms the text’s status as the definitive book on the subject. Combining both his expertise as academic and practitioner, Malcolm Shaw’s survey of the subject motivates and challenges both student and professional. By offering an unbeatable combination of clarity of expression and academic rigour, he ensures both understanding and critical analysis in an engaging and authoritative style. The text has been updated throughout to reflect recent case law and treaty developments. It retains the detailed references which encourage and assist further reading and study.

 2015

Ilias Bantekas and Efthymios Papastravridis, International Law Concentrate, 2nd edition, Oxford University Press, 2015.

International Law Concentrate is the essential study and revision guide for law students looking for extra marks. The clear, succinct coverage enables you to quickly grasp the fundamental principles of this area of law and helps you to succeed in exams. This guide has been rigorously reviewed and is endorsed by students and lecturers for level of coverage, accuracy, and exam advice.

 Mark Elliott and David Feldman (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Public Law, Cambridge University Press, 2015.

The Cambridge Companion to Public Law examines key themes, debates and issues in contemporary public law. The book identifies and draws out five key themes: the notions of government and the state; the place of the state and public law in the world at large; relationships between institutions and officials within the state; the legitimacy of institutions; and the identity and value of public law in relation to politics. The book also presents a contemporary examination, taking account of the substantial changes witnessed in this area in recent decades and of the resulting need to reassess orthodox accounts of the subject. Written by leading authorities drawn from across the common law world, their approach is rigorous, engaging and highly accessible. This Companion acts as both a thoughtful introduction and a collection that consciously moves the discipline forward.

2016

Henny Strydom et al., International Law, Oxford University Press, 2016.

International Law offers a rigorous yet accessible introduction to public international law for students. Presenting a clearly structured conceptual framework, the text is designed to support understanding by providing a concise, coherent perspective of international law principles and systems at domestic, regional and international levels. In addition to the standard, core material addressed in international law curriculae, the text examines judgments from South African courts and African jurisdictions, and provides a challenging analysis of key, emerging developments which are particularly relevant to the African context.

2017

Anders Henriksen, International Law, Oxford University Press, 2017.

International Law provides a fresh, student-focused approach and European perspective on the central issues in public international law. Providing ideal coverage for short foundational courses, this engaging new textbook introduces all the essential topics in a concise and manageable way. Dedicated chapters on environmental law, economic law, and human rights are included, ensuring that appropriate coverage is given to the various areas affected by international law. The core topics are fully explained in plain terms and the principles and key terminology outlined in an accessible style. Taking a critical perspective throughout, Henriksen introduces the areas of debate and builds students’ confidence in understanding the complexities of the international legal system and its operation across borders. Particular emphasis is placed on the key issues in civil law jurisdictions, making this text perfectly suited for students based in mainland Europe.

 Jan Klabbers, International Law, 2nd edition, Cambridge University Press, 2017.

Written by one of the world’s leading international lawyers, this is a landmark publication in the teaching of international law. International law can be defined as ‘the rules governing the legal relationship between nations and states’, but in reality it is much more complex, with political, diplomatic and socio-economic factors shaping the law and its application. This refreshingly clear, concise textbook encourages students to view international law as a dynamic system of organizing the world. Bringing international law back to its first principles, the book is organised around four questions: where does it come from? To whom does it apply? How does it resolve conflict? What does it say? Building on these questions with both academic rigour and clarity of expression, Professor Klabbers breathes life and energy into the subject. Footnotes point students to the wider academic debate while chapter introductions and final remarks reinforce learning.

Forthcoming

 Malcolm N. Shaw, International Law, 8th edition, Cambridge University Press, 2017.

International Law is the definitive and authoritative text on the subject, offering Shaw’s unbeatable combination of clarity of expression and academic rigour and ensuring both understanding and critical analysis in an engaging and authoritative style. Encompassing the leading principles, practice and cases, and retaining and developing the detailed references which encourage and assist the reader in further study, this new edition motivates and challenges students and professionals while remaining accessible and engaging. Fully updated to reflect recent case law and treaty developments, this edition contains an expanded treatment of the relationship between international and domestic law, the principles of international humanitarian law, and international criminal law alongside additional material on international economic law.

 Cameron Miles and Eirik Bjorge (eds.), Landmark Cases in Public International Law, Hart Publishing, 2018.

The past 200 years have seen the transformation of public international law from a rule-based extrusion of diplomacy into a fully-fledged legal system. Landmark Cases in Public International Law examines decisions that have developed international law into an integrated whole, whilst also creating specialized sub-systems that stand alone as units of analysis. The significance of these decisions is not taken for granted, with contributors critically interrogating the cases to determine if their reputation as ‘landmarks’ is deserved. Emphasis is also placed on seeing each case as a diplomatic artefact, highlighting that international law, while unquestionably a legal system, remains reliant on the practice and consent of states as the prime movers of development.

 Other – International Treaty Collections

Ole Kristian Fauchald and Bård Sverre Tuseth, Global and Regional Treaties, Akademika – Oslo, 2016.

 Malcolm Evans (ed.), Blackstone’s International Law Documents, 12th edition, Oxford University Press, 2015.

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