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Colleen Rohan and Gentian Zyberi (eds), Defense Perspectives on International Criminal Justice (Cambridge University Press, 2017)

15/05/2017 – 2:40 pm | Comments Off on Colleen Rohan and Gentian Zyberi (eds), Defense Perspectives on International Criminal Justice (Cambridge University Press, 2017)

Edited by Colleen Rohan (International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY)) and Gentian Zyberi (Norwegian Centre for Human Rights, University of Oslo). For a discount see the flyer Defence Perspectives on International Criminal Justice_Flyer.
Introduction
The edited volume ‘Defense Perspectives on International Criminal Justice’ is the first comprehensive book focusing on the multi-faceted role of the Defence in international criminal proceedings. This examination of the role …

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Academia, Human Rights, International Criminal Law, International Humanitarian Law, Literature, Public International Law, Publications, References, Relevant Literature, University »

International Criminal Law and International Criminal Procedural Law Textbooks: From 2010 Onwards

06/06/2017 – 3:58 pm |

* Compiled by Henriette (Jet) Jakobien Liesker, Research Assistant, Norwegian Centre for Human Rights, University of Oslo.

 The list of textbooks on International Criminal Law and International Criminal Procedural Law (from 2010 onwards), together with the list of textbooks on Public International Law (from 2012 onwards), International Human Rights Law (from 2014 onwards), and International Humanitarian Law (from 2011 onwards) are meant to help international law teachers of these courses in selecting a suitable, updated textbook for their courses. The lists might not be comprehensive, so if you are missing your textbook from the list (the textbook needs to be within the prescribed time limits, written in English, and easily purchased online), please take contact with us. With thanks to Henriette (Jet) Jakobien Liesker for putting these lists together.

2010

Ilias Bantekas, International Criminal Law, 4th edition, Hart Publishing, 2010.

This book offers a comprehensive analysis of the major areas of international criminal law (ICL). It approaches its subject matter from both a criminal law and an international law perspective, analysing the various topics exhaustively but in an accessible manner. While looking at the jurisprudence of the international tribunals, it is not confined to this approach, instead looking at all the fields in which ICL is employed.

2011

Bartram S. Brown (ed.), Research Handbook on International Criminal Law, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2011.

T his carefully regarded and well-structured handbook covers the broad range of norms, practices, policies, processes and institutional mechanisms of international criminal law, exploring how they operate and continue to develop in a variety of contexts. Leading scholars in the field and experienced practitioners have brought together their expertise and perspectives in a clear and concise fashion to create an authoritative resource, which will be useful and accessible even to those without legal training.

 Antonio Cassese et al., International Criminal Law: Cases and Commentary, Oxford University Press, 2011.

International Criminal Law: Cases and Commentary presents a concise and comprehensive explanation of the development of major areas in substantive international criminal law, through a selection of key illustrative cases from domestic and international jurisdictions. The focus is on the law related to individual criminal liability for war crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide and aggression, with specific attention paid to sources of international criminal law, fundamental principles of criminal responsibility and defences.

William A. Schabas and Nadia Bernaz (eds.), Routledge Handbook of International Criminal Law, Routledge, 2011.

International criminal law has developed extraordinarily quickly over the last decade, with the creation of ad hoc tribunals in the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda, and the establishment of a permanent International Criminal Court. This book provides a timely and comprehensive survey of emerging and existing areas of international criminal law.

 Christine Van den Wyngaert and Steven Dewulf (eds.), International Criminal Law, 4th edition, Brill / Nijhoff, 2011.

This collection is meant to guide students and practitioners through the labyrinth of international criminal law instruments. It comprises international (universal) and Euro-pean conventions, while also including other regional instruments (AU/OAU, ASEAN, the Commonwealth, OAS and SAARC).

2012

Cherif Bassiouni, Introduction to International Criminal Law: 2nd Revised Edition, Brill / Nijhoff, 2012.

Written by one of the world’s pioneers and leading authorities on international criminal law, this text book covers the history, nature, and sources of international criminal law; the ratione personae; ratione materiae–sources of substantive international criminal law; the indirect enforcement system; the direct enforcement system; the function of the international criminal court; rules of procedure and evidence applicable to international criminal proceedings; and the future of international criminal law.

 Christoph Safferling, International Criminal Procedure, Oxford University Press, 2012.

This book sets out and analyses the procedural law applied by international criminal tribunals and the International Criminal Court (ICC). It traces the development of international criminal procedure from its roots in the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg to its current application by the Yugoslav and Rwanda Tribunals, the Special Court for Sierra Leone, the Extraordinary Chamber in the Courts of Cambodia, and the International Criminal Court. All of these tribunals apply a different set of rules. The focus of this book, however, lies on the ICC and its procedural regime as contained in the Rome Statute, the Rules of Procedure and Evidence, and the different Regulations of the Court and of the Prosecutor.

2013

Linda E. Carter and Fausto Pocar (eds.), International Criminal Procedure: The Interface of Civil Law and Common Law Legal Systems, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2013.

The emergence of international criminal courts, beginning with the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and including the International Criminal Court, has also brought an evolving international criminal procedure. In this book, the authors examine selected issues that reflect a blending of, or choice between, civil law and common law models of procedure. The topics include background on civil law and common law legal systems; plea bargaining; witness proofing; written and oral evidence; self-representation and the use of assigned, standby, and amicus counsel; the role of victims; and the right to appeal.

 Antonio Cassese and Paola Gaeta, Cassese’s International Criminal Law, 3rd edition, Oxford University Press, 2013.

The third edition of Cassese’s International Criminal Law provides a clear account of the main substantive and procedural aspects of international criminal law. Adopting a combination of the classic common law and more theoretical approaches to the subject, it discusses:

  • the historical evolution of international criminal law;
  • the legal definition of the so-called core crimes (war crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide) plus aggression, torture and terrorism;
  • the forms and modes of criminal responsibility; and
  • the main issues related to the prosecution and punishment of international crimes at the national and international level, including amnesties, statutes of limitations and immunities.
  • Link

 Göran Sluiter et al. (eds.), International Criminal Procedure, Oxford University Press, 2013.

International Criminal Procedure: Principles and Rules is a comprehensive study of international criminal proceedings written by over forty leading experts in the field. The book offers a systematic overview and detailed comparison of the standards governing the conduct of proceedings in all major international and internationalized criminal courts from the Nuremberg and Tokyo Tribunals to the recently established Cambodian Extraordinary Chambers and the Special Tribunal for Lebanon.

 Claire de Than and Russell Heaton, Criminal Law, 4th edition, Oxford University Press, 2013.

Criminal Law introduces undergraduates to the principles of criminal law through a fresh and stimulating approach. With a reputation for providing a readable and understandable account of the law relating to criminal offences, this book allows the reader to develop a full appreciation of the fundamentals of the subject whilst highlighting and examining key areas for debate.

 2014

Robert Cryer et al., An Introduction to International Criminal Law and Procedure, 3rd edition, Cambridge University Press, 2014.

By offering both a comprehensive update and new material reflecting the continuing development of the subject, this continues to be the leading textbook on international criminal law. Its experienced author team draws on its combined expertise as teachers, scholars and practitioners to offer an authoritative survey of the field. The third edition contains new material on the theory of international criminal law, the practice of international criminal tribunals, the developing case law on principles of liability and procedures and new practice on immunities. It offers valuable supporting online materials such as case studies, worked examples and study guides. Retaining its comprehensive coverage, clarity and critical analysis, it remains essential reading for all in the field.

 Raphael Kamuli, Modern International Criminal Justice, Intersentia, 2014.

Scrutinizing all the relevant case-law of the International Criminal Court (ICC), this book elucidates the paradigm that the ICC’s jurisprudence represents in international criminal justice. It presents in-depth knowledge of how contemporary international criminal justice preserves, departs from or extends the principles that have developed since the Nuremberg Trials. The author explains how the ICC affirms that the most serious crimes of international concern must not go unpunished.

 Vladimir Tochilovsky, The Law and Jurisprudence of the International Criminal Tribunals and Courts, 2nd edition, Intersentia, 2014.

This book provides the most comprehensive overview of the law and jurisprudence of the ad hoc international criminal tribunals and courts, and the International Criminal Court. It also includes relevant jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights and practice of the UN Human Rights Committee.

2015

Roger O’Keefe, International Criminal Law, Oxford University Press, 2015.

International Criminal Law provides a comprehensive overview of an increasingly integral part of public international law. It complements the usual accounts of the substantive law of those international crimes tried to date before international criminal courts and of the institutional law of those courts with in-depth analyses of fundamental formal juridical concepts such as an ‘international crime’ and an ‘international criminal court’; with detailed examinations of the many international crimes provided for by way of multilateral treaty and of the attendant obligations and rights of states parties; and with sustained attention to the implementation of international criminal law at the national level. Direct, concise, and precise, International Criminal Law should prove a valuable resource for scholars and practitioners of the discipline of international criminal law.

2016

 Antonio Cassese et al. (eds.), International Criminal Law: Critical Concepts in Law, Routledge, 2016.

The volume editors have realized an ambitious aim. Not only does International Criminal Law bring together ground-breaking material sourced from a wide range of academic journals, edited collections, textbooks, and monographs, many of which are now hard to obtain, the editors also illuminate the much broader—and fundamental—issues related to impunity, guilt, restitution, and social reconciliation.

 André Klip, European Criminal Law, 3rd edition, Intersentia, 2016.

This third edition explains European criminal law as a multi-level field of law, in which the European Union has a normative influence on substantive criminal law, criminal procedure and on the co-operation between Member States. It analyses the contours of the emerging criminal justice system of the European Union and presents a coherent picture of the legislation enacted, the case law on European Union level and its influence on national criminal law and criminal procedure, with specific attention for the position of the accused.

 Valsamis Mitsilegas et al (eds.), Research Handbook on EU Criminal Law, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016.

EU criminal law is one of the fastest evolving, but also challenging, policy areas and fields of law. This Handbook provides a comprehensive and advanced analysis of EU criminal law as a structurally and constitutionally unique policy area and field of research. With contributions from leading experts, focusing on their respective fields of research, the book is preoccupied with defining cross-border or ‘Euro-crimes’, while allowing Member States to sanction criminal behaviour through mutual cooperation. It contains a web of institutions, agencies and external liaisons, which ensure the protection of EU citizens from serious crime, while protecting the fundamental rights of suspects and criminals.

 Ellen S. Podgor et al., International Criminal Law Cases and Materials, 4th edition, Carolina Academic Press, 2016.

International Criminal Law provides a set of teaching materials furnishing students with a grounding in the transnational issues likely to arise in federal criminal cases, and also in the law produced as a consequence of international efforts to impose criminal responsibility on the perpetrators of human rights atrocities. International Criminal Law offers, for teaching purposes, a collection of cases (mainly domestic) and other materials, together with notes and questions about those cases and materials. The Fourth Edition contains a new chapter on human trafficking.

 William A. Schabas (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to International Criminal Law, Cambridge University Press, 2016.

This comprehensive introduction to international criminal law addresses the big issues in the subject from an interdisciplinary perspective. Expert contributors include international lawyers, judges, prosecutors, criminologists and historians, as well as the last surviving prosecutor of the Nuremberg Trials. Serving as a foundation for deeper study, each chapter explores key academic debates and provides guidelines for further reading. The book is organised around several themes, including institutions, crimes and trials. Purposes and principles place the discipline within a broader context, covering the relationship with human rights law, transitional justice, punishment and the imperatives of peace. Several tribunals are explored in depth, as are many emblematic trials. The book concludes with perspectives on the future.

 Forthcoming

John R.W.D. Jones QC and Miša Zgonec-Rožej (eds.), Blackstone’s International Criminal Practice, Oxford University Press, 2018.

Blackstone’s International Criminal Practice is the definitive guide to the practice of the international criminal courts, tribunals and relevant domestic practice. This one volume, readily accessible guide provides practitioners with everything they need to ensure their case goes smoothly in the tribunal or court. This book contains comprehensive analysis of the practice, procedure, and substantive application of international criminal law. It covers the practice of all major international and internationalised criminal courts with primary focus on the International Criminal Court but also includes coverage of war crimes tribunals established for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda, Lebanon, Sierra Leone, Cambodia, and for other conflict zones. The text analyses relevant jurisprudence and key practice before the domestic courts including the development of the principle of universal jurisdiction and related sections on extradition and mutual legal assistance.

 Philipp Kasnter (ed.), International Criminal Law in Context, Routledge, 2018.

International Criminal Law in Context provides a critical and contextual introduction to the fundamentals of international criminal law. It goes beyond a doctrinal analysis focussed on the practice of international tribunals to draw on a variety of perspectives, capturing the complex processes of internationalisation that criminal law has experienced over the past few decades.

Public International Law Textbooks: From 2012 Onwards

31/05/2017 – 11:37 am |

* Prepared by Henriette (Jet) Jakobien Liesker, Research Assistant, Norwegian Centre for Human Rights, University of Oslo.
2012
Gideon Boas, Public International Law: Contemporary Principles and Perspectives, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2012.
Public International Law offers a comprehensive understanding of international law as well as a fresh and highly accessible approach. While explaining the theory and development of international law, this work also examines how it functions in practice. Case …

CfP: Symposium on Effective Control in International Law, China University of Political Science and Law, Beijing, 11 to 12 November 2017

30/05/2017 – 3:25 pm |

Effective control is a notion going through many branches of international law, and has been researched by many international law scholars and experts separately. Nevertheless, a systematic research focusing on this particular notion from the perspective of diverse branches of international law is missing, and deserves further research.
Inspired by this idea, School of International Law, China University of Political Science and Law (CUPL) is pleased, …

New article: Between Universalism and Regional Law and Politics: A Comparative History of the American, European and African Human Rights Systems

29/05/2017 – 1:35 pm |

Alexandra Valeria Huneeus, Associate Professor at the University of Wisconsin Law School and Mikael Rask Madsen, Professor and iCourts Principal Investigator, have published a new article: Between Universalism and Regional Law and Politics: A Comparative History of the American, European and African Human Rights Systems.
Here is the abstract:
Regional human rights have been heralded as one of the greatest innovations of international law of the 20th century. …

International Humanitarian Law textbooks: From 2011 onwards

26/05/2017 – 11:32 am | Comments Off on International Humanitarian Law textbooks: From 2011 onwards

* Prepared by Henriette (Jet) Jakobien Liesker, Research Assistant, Norwegian Centre for Human Rights, University of Oslo.
This is a list of IHL textbooks published since 2011 onwards, which can be of use to IHL teachers looking for teaching resources for their courses. A lot of materials are available for free from the ICRC website at ‘Learning and Teaching IHL‘, ‘How Does Law Protect in War‘, and …

Oxford University Press launches the Max Planck Encyclopedia of Comparative Constitutional Law

21/05/2017 – 1:00 pm | Comments Off on Oxford University Press launches the Max Planck Encyclopedia of Comparative Constitutional Law

Oxford University Press has recently launched the Max Planck Encyclopedia of Comparative Constitutional Law (MPECCoL), a new addition to the Oxford Constitutional Law family.

Developed for use by constitutional lawyers, academics, and students;
Provides comprehensive analysis of constitutional law topics in a comparative context;
Linked to the constitutional texts so users can verify accuracy of commentary;
Built with accessibility in mind, with browsing by subject matter and simple search …

International Courts Improve Public Deliberation

16/05/2017 – 12:55 pm | Comments Off on International Courts Improve Public Deliberation

Shai Dothan, associate professor in iCourts, has published a new paper.
Here is the abstract:
Public deliberation is essential for democracy to flourish. Taking decisions away from elected bodies and transferring them to courts seems to diminish deliberation. The damage appears even greater when decisions are taken away from domestic bodies and given to international courts—organizations considered to be completely independent from the public. But this view …

Postdoctoral position available in SMART – SMART – NB. Deadline 22 May

16/05/2017 – 9:50 am | Comments Off on Postdoctoral position available in SMART – SMART – NB. Deadline 22 May

A position as Postdoctoral Research Fellow is available for two years to undertake research as part of SMART. While the application must be submitted via the official call, more detailed information about the ongoing and planned work in SMART is given here, as important background for the potential applicants.

Ongoing and planned research in SMART
SMART intends to significantly advance the understanding of how policies and regulations …

Social Networks and the Enforcement of International Law

02/05/2017 – 2:15 pm | Comments Off on Social Networks and the Enforcement of International Law

Shai Dothan, associate professor in iCourts, has published a new paper on Social Networks and the Enforcement of International Law.
Here is the abstract:
Social Network Analysis has a growing influence on legal scholarship. By investigating social connections between individuals or institutions, hypotheses about their behavior can be raised and tested. One of the key debates in Social Network Analysis is whether interactions within the network can …

Leiden Summer School: ‘International Humanitarian Law in Theory and Practice’

28/04/2017 – 2:03 pm | Comments Off on Leiden Summer School: ‘International Humanitarian Law in Theory and Practice’

From 9 to 15 July 2017, the Grotius Centre for International Legal Studies at Leiden University and its Kalshoven-Gieskes Forum on International Humanitarian Law will host their second IHL Summer School in The Hague, in close cooperation with the Netherlands Red Cross. This unique programme aims to give a broad overview of the laws of armed conflict and gives opportunities to test the acquisition of knowledge through …

The use of armed force in Syria: getting from bad to worse?

15/04/2017 – 8:19 pm | 4 Comments

Background
* A lot of the background information used below is taken from the BBC Syria timeline profile. The post has been amended to portray better the cause for the beginning of the conflict in Syria.
A lot has been written about the armed conflict in Syria in international law blogs including Ejil:Talk, Opinio Juris and Just Security, especially after the US attack deploying 59 Tomahawk cruise …

CfP: Special Issue on the Relationship between International Human Rights Law and International Humanitarian Law, Guest Editors: Steven Dewulf and Katharine Fortin

12/04/2017 – 4:57 pm | Comments Off on CfP: Special Issue on the Relationship between International Human Rights Law and International Humanitarian Law, Guest Editors: Steven Dewulf and Katharine Fortin

The theme of this special edition of the Journal of Human Rights and International Legal Discourse is the relationship between international humanitarian law and international human rights law. This is a topic that has prompted considerable academic debate ever since the Geneva Conventions and Universal Declaration of Human rights were drafted in the late 1940s. In the early years, the debate centred on the question …

The International Criminal Court Summer School 2017, 19-23 June 2017, NUI Galway, Ireland

11/04/2017 – 8:34 pm | Comments Off on The International Criminal Court Summer School 2017, 19-23 June 2017, NUI Galway, Ireland

The Irish Centre for Human Rights at the National University of Ireland Galway is pleased to announce that the annual International Criminal Court Summer School will take place from 19 to 23 June.
The annual International Criminal Court Summer School at the Irish Centre for Human Rights is the premier summer school specialising on the International Criminal Court. The summer school allows participants the opportunity to …

Just published: Spring 2017 issue of the European Journal of Legal Studies

10/04/2017 – 3:36 pm | Comments Off on Just published: Spring 2017 issue of the European Journal of Legal Studies

The new Spring 2017 issue of the European Journal of Legal Studies has gone online: http://ejls.eu/issue/23/.
The topics tackled in this edition range from the Council of Europe Istanbul Convention on Preventing and Combating Violence against Women and Domestic Violence, over the European Court of Justice’s interpretation of the fundamental right to conduct business, to the cross-border portability of online content services in the EU and …

CALL FOR PAPERS: DEVELOPING A BENEFIT-COST FRAMEWORK FOR DATA POLICY GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY ANTONIN SCALIA LAW SCHOOL with the FUTURE OF PRIVACY FORUM

07/04/2017 – 11:03 am | Comments Off on CALL FOR PAPERS: DEVELOPING A BENEFIT-COST FRAMEWORK FOR DATA POLICY GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY ANTONIN SCALIA LAW SCHOOL with the FUTURE OF PRIVACY FORUM

Data flows are central to an increasingly large share of the economy. A wide array of products and business models—from the sharing economy and artificial intelligence to autonomous vehicles and embedded medical devices—rely on personal data. Consequently, privacy regulation leaves a large economic footprint. As with any regulatory enterprise, the key to sound data policy is striking a balance between competing interests and norms that …

Launch of the Global Campus Human Rights Journal (GCHRJ)

24/03/2017 – 10:29 am | Comments Off on Launch of the Global Campus Human Rights Journal (GCHRJ)

Aims 
The Global Campus of Human Rights is proud to announce the launch of the Global Campus Human Rights Journal (GCHRJ), a peer-reviewed online publication serving as a forum for rigorous scholarly analysis, critical commentaries, and reports on recent developments pertaining to human rights and democratisation globally. The first issue is now available online at https://globalcampus.eiuc.org/human-rights-journal.
GCHRJ is edited by a team of three, led by Frans …

New issue of the Nordic Journal of Human Rights is out (Volume 35, Issue 1, 2017)

16/03/2017 – 6:49 pm | One Comment

* With thanks to Anne Christine Lie, managing editor of the NJHR.
Nordic Journal of Human Rights (2017) Volume 35, Issue 1, pp 1-84.
The Nordic Journal of Human Rights spring issue of 2017 features four research articles covering a wide range of human rights topics: the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, tort law and human rights in business, the right to health care in …

The Cambridge International and European Law Conference 2017, “Transforming Institutions”, 23-24 March 2017, University of Cambridge

12/03/2017 – 6:11 pm | Comments Off on The Cambridge International and European Law Conference 2017, “Transforming Institutions”, 23-24 March 2017, University of Cambridge

The Cambridge International and European Law Conference shall take place on Thursday 23rd and Friday 24th March 2017. The conference is organized by the Cambridge International Law Journal in association with the Centre for European Legal Studies (CELS) and Monckton Chambers.
The theme of this year’s conference is “Transforming Institutions” and shall take place in the David Williams Building, Law Faculty, The University of Cambridge.
The full …

Opportunity to Study Transatlantic Privacy Law in Amsterdam this Summer

01/03/2017 – 12:46 pm | Comments Off on Opportunity to Study Transatlantic Privacy Law in Amsterdam this Summer

Online activities quite often involve transfers of personal data between the European Union (EU) and the United States (US), for example when using online search, social networks and many mobile apps. Both regions are governed by different rules on the protection of informational privacy and personal data. The EU’s stance on data protection law made the headlines when its highest court ruled that individuals have …